Hamilton and The Eye of The Pyramid

I expected “Hamilton” to be a rather elaborate defense of The Eye of The Pyramid and it was certainly that.  I did not expect a serious downplaying of Jefferson’s role in the Revolution, in a bit of New York slight on DC, even if Jefferson and Hamilton were rivals.  There was some amends made in referencing Jefferson’s diplomatic work recruiting French support, while referencing Hamilton’s political neutrality on France’s own Revolution.  And certainly, in terms of Character assessment, Hamilton’s enthusiasm for duels – that most manly of 1700 pissing contests – at the expense of his wife and family speaks far greater volumes than a brief adulterous affair; the effects of this were not down-played.

I cannot help but write my favorite Jefferson quote: “I have sworn upon the altar of God, eternal hostility against every form of tyranny over the mind of man.”  He wrote it in the context of religion, but that wisdom applies to money all the same, as Jefferson knew.  Still, in so far as popularizing interest in American History, I do think “Hamilton” does more good than harm; and I think we can all agree with Burr’s sentiments in the end: The world is wide enough for both Hamilton and Us.

An American Revolution

Bernie Sanders seems like a nice man.  He is genuine, and not mean, and not dumb – and saying the three together is saying a lot.  I nevertheless think he is wrong as to the nature of the revolution which America needs.

It is the common failing of many who take a calm and reasoned approach that they think the world would best evolve with a strictly calm and reasoned approach.  The truth is, it is with liberty that the world moves forward.  It is the creators and explorers – the ones pushing the envelope and making the most of what they are given – which change the world for the better.  And if it is the job of governance to maximize anything, it should be individual liberty, rather than a preconceived notion of utility handed from on high.  Sure the people often don’t truly know what is best for them – and this is specifically true in matters of security – but it is often equally true that the people supposedly concerned for other’s well being don’t truly know what is best for the future; and this is where the creators and explorers break through.

And this is where I have to tell Americans that under socialism and it’s older sibling, there are not breakthroughs.  There are not true leaders and there are not inspirers.  There is only one of the ways that the world has always been and it is deemed, by them, to be the right way, or else.  This kind of attitude is widespread on The Continent, and surely extends to Sander’s beloved Scandinavia.  But the EU in no way ‘has it right’.  The greatest problem is that a person of exceptional talent and production does not cut through the bureaucratic morass unless they first agree to toe the line on social issue X, Y, and Z; which are – guess what – policies which on the whole further restrict the liberty which talent needs in order to break through in the future.

Socialists, on this, are of course no worse than conservatives.  But it is time for us to recognize that we are actually neither.  We are actually Libertarians.  No, not corporate Libertarians, but actual Libertarians.  People concerned to preserve individual liberty, making as few compromises for the sake of security as possible, but not willing to let the perpetual creep of fear – notorious in Europe – undermine our future with its chill.

If there is to be any revolution at all – and there should be – it will have to be an American one.